Don't quote me on that

I was talking with a fellow Temple News alum, Chris, about punctuation and quotation marks. Specifically, if a question mark always must go inside a quote, as in: Did he really say "I'm going to slap you back to the Roaring Twenties"? (I have no idea what that means.) If you work at a newspaper (as Chris and I do) this isn't an issue that comes up a lot, since newspapers don't usually ask question inside stories. So I checked the New York Times stylebook, which said that periods and commas always go inside quotes (Yes, he really said, "I'm going to slap you back to the Roaring Twenties."); that commas and semicolons always go outside quotes (Yes, he really said, "I'm going to slap you back to the Roaring Twenties"; he's an idiot.); and that question marks and exclamation points go inside or outside, depending on if they refer to just the quote or the entire sentence (No, he actually said, "Can I slap you back to the Roaring Twenties?").

So the example in the first paragraph above is correct, at least according to NYT style. This makes sense, because punctuating that way gives a cue to the reader who is asking the question (or making an exclamation).